A PaperPrancer’s world

A PaperPrancer is someone who is addicted to books, gets lost in timeless stories, who explores the many worlds within the Planet of Pages, through the flush of tales on or off-screen, in the Realm of Words… An adventurer, a traveller through time, space and thought… PaperPrancer is here to take you on a journey […]

Review: A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle

“It was a dark and stormy night.
Out of this wild night, a strange visitor comes to the Murry house and beckons Meg, her brother Charles Wallace, and their friend Calvin O’Keefe on a most dangerous and extraordinary adventure— one that will threaten their lives and our universe.”

A children’s book first published in 1962, A Wrinkle in Time explores the concepts of travel through space and time. If you have read and loved the Chronicles of Narnia by CS Lewis, you will notice a similar tone in the book. The story follows three British children as they journey through other worlds in a quest to rescue their (Meg and Charles Wallace’s) father from the clutches of an evil entity called “The Black Thing”.

Like most children’s fantasy books, this novel too explores the concept of good versus evil. The tale contains a hodge-podge of themes including the fight against conformity (political allegory), Scientific theories like a fifth dimension (tesseract or a wrinkle in the space-time continuum) to travel through the universe and other concepts that even lead to a ban of the book (for “the book’s listing the name of Jesus Christ together with the names of great artists, philosophers, scientists, and religious leaders“).

a wrinkle in time, sci fi, wrinkle in time, wrinkle in time review, sci fi books, book review, sci fi movies, madeline lengle, childrens book, wrinkle in time, wrinkle in time movie, books, movies 2018, childrens movies, latest movies, latest books, 2018 books, fantasy books, narnia
The tale contains a hodge-podge of themes including the fight against conformity (political allegory), Scientific theories like a fifth dimension (tesseract or a wrinkle in the space-time continuum)…

Reviews for the book have ranged from a nostalgic love to sheer annoyance at the plot-line with many lose ends. “Artistically, the book is a mess; it’s illogical, derivative and confusing, with a rushed and unconvincing ending,” The Washington Post noted. Readers must understand that this is a book written not for the adult’s logical whims but for the child’s imaginative mind.  The story dips a toe in a lake of important names and topics to trigger an unaware reader’s curiosity and hopefully push them to question and research.

Rating: Three and a half choco-chip cookies
Genre: Children’s, fantasy, sci-fi
Buy the book here: Amazon
Other titles by Madeline L’Engle: A Swiftly Tilting Planet, A Wind in the Door

What I enjoyed about the book (Spoilers ahead):

Continue reading “Review: A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle”